Post tagged with "peak demand"

Our Thinking

Singapore just had its driest month since 1869. Here’s what that means for the power grid.

  • By Aaron Tinjum
  • March 19, 2014

SingaporeExtreme weather puts extreme strain on the electricity grid.

Around the world, grid operators have been working overtime to manage spikes in demand caused by extreme weather events — whether it be snowstorms, heavy rain, or heat waves.

Such has been the case in Singapore during the first quarter of this year. According to Singapore’s National Environment Agency, February 2014 was Singapore’s driest month in 145 years. Over the course of the month, only seven days had any rainfall, with some parts of Singapore receiving only 0.2 mm of rain. Complicating matters was a persistent fog of smoke blowing from forest and peat fires in Indonesia, which caused a sustained and significant drop in air quality.

Read More
Our Thinking

500 utility leaders were asked to share their innermost thoughts on the industry. Their answers might surprise you.

  • By Aaron Tinjum
  • March 10, 2014

As we’ve written before, the electric utility industry finds itself at an exciting crossroads, characterized by meaningful challenges as well as unprecedented opportunity. Determining how to navigate this crossroads successfully is arguably the most important project that utility executives face today. So, what’s on their mind?

In the first-ever State of the Electric Utility report, Utility Dive surveyed more than 500 electric utility professionals on a variety of industry issues, ranging from distributed generation to electric vehicles. Here are a few of their responses that caught our eye.

Read More
Our Thinking

Everything’s bigger in Texas…including the potential for demand response

  • By Richard Caperton
  • February 20, 2014

When we flip on a light switch, we expect the lights to come on.

Of course, many things can go wrong. A storm could knock out power lines, a car could crash into a transformer, a grid operator could mismanage the system, or solar flares could fry the entire power grid.

Those are some of the more exciting scenarios. But, another reason — that doesn’t get as much public attention — is that there aren’t enough power plants to meet demand at any particular time.

Read More
Older Posts